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The Moorfields marsh

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Excavations of the post-Roman layers uncovered marshy areas adjacent to the Walbrook. The land was consolidated and from 1569 to 1772 was part of the ‘New Churchyard’. In the 19th century much of it was taken over by the development of the railways.

The Moorfields marsh

Due to the marshy nature of the land, the area to the north of the city wall became known as Moorfields. Throughout the medieval period efforts were made to manage the water flow.

The Walbrook was re-named the ‘Deep Ditch’ and timber revetments (retaining walls) were built. Remains of these were found during the excavations.

An additional gate in the city wall, Moorgate, was built in the 15th century but development remained largely along the road that ran north out of the City. In the 16th century the ‘Deep Ditch’ was re-cut to the east of the original Walbrook. By the mid- to late 16th century it had become an open sewer and rubbish dump. The nature of the area changed again with the establishment of the ‘New Churchyard’ in 1569.